The Lempert Report ®

The Lempert Report | 23 July 2009

Phil Lempert’s 5-minute Marketing Analysis, Issues & Trends and the impact on the food and retail environments.

Jul 22, 2009 Watch Video

The Lempert Report | 16 July 2009

Phil Lempert’s 5-minute Marketing Analysis, Issues & Trends and the impact on the food and retail environments.

Jul 13, 2009 Watch Video

The Lempert Report | 9 July 2009

Phil Lempert’s 5-minute Marketing Analysis, Issues & Trends and the impact on the food and retail environments.

Jul 07, 2009 Watch Video

The Lempert Report | 2 July 2009

Phil Lempert’s 5-minute Marketing Analysis, Issues & Trends and the impact on the food and retail environments.

Jun 28, 2009 Watch Video

The Lempert Report | 25 June 2009

Phil Lempert’s 5-minute Marketing Analysis, Issues & Trends and the impact on the food and retail environments.

Jun 23, 2009 Watch Video

Aldi + Giant-Landover - The Lempert Report

The Lempert Report Food News: Marketing, analysis, issues & trends and the impact on food and retail environments, specifically for the B2B food world with reporting and commentary on consumer and retailing trends by Phil Lempert. Phil can predict the future —and then help businesses and consumers understand it. For more than 25 years, Lempert, an expert analyst on consumer behavior, marketing trends, new products and the changing retail landscape, has identified and explained impending trends to consumers and some of the most prestigious companies worldwide. Known as The Supermarket Guru®, http://www.supermarketguru.com, Lempert is a distinguished author and speaker who alerts customers and business leaders to impending corporate and consumer trends, and empowers them to make educated purchasing and marketing decisions. To see more of The Lempert Report visit: http://www.thelempertreport.com The Lempert Report for Thursday June 18, 2009 Two supermarkets that do it right Supermarkets are supposed to shine when it comes to staples, especially during a fiscally wrenching period like this where household purchases are largely essentials. Food stores are supposed to represent the one retail class that consumers could count on to deliver basics without fuss, consistently and ethically, in any economy. The retail graveyards are proof, however, that many marquee names have tripped up on the fundamentals, or were eventually shunned due to their own arrogance. Why else wouldnt food stores assort and price to suit their markets, or execute consistently in the aisles, or keep known brands on the shelves that people trust—whether national or regional? Two operators, Giant-Landover and Aldi, seem to have the formula right for todays environment, the approaches differ, but both work for their customers. Giant-Landover grew sales by 3.6% in its latest quarter by delivering elements beyond price that shoppers want: comfort (wide aisles, bright lights), savings and speed (thru hand-held scanners), and access to healthful foods. The chains third-straight quarter of sales growth represents efforts by the mid-Atlantic operator to help restore market share under attack by Wegmans, Harris Teeter, Whole Foods and others. The Baltimore Sun newspaper cited Food World magazine figures that Giant lost nearly two points of market share in the 12 months ended March 2008. Aldi offers limited assortments just 1,400 fast-turn items and features its own brands almost exclusively, plus high-quality fresh produce. The chain claims it can save shoppers up to 50% on their purchases and meet 90% of a households grocery needs. Its compact stores, at 8,000 square feet, devote about 40% of space to fresh perishables and frozen foods. Aldi consistently presents low prices to shoppers, and uncomplicated business terms to the suppliers upon which it relies. The chains principles: no rebates, discounts, coupons, slotting fees or unwarranted deductions. This anticipated rise is nearly double the growth from the previous year. In 2008, gardeners spent a total of $2.5 billion on plants and kindred gardening supplies to grow their own food. The estimated productive annual yield of a well-maintained food garden is $500, net of costs. Not bad when you know that the average person in 2007, according to the Bureau of Labor Statistics spent just $211 for the year on fresh fruits and vegetables. But then there is the assortment issue, to be discussed in a future episode.And then there are those backyard chickens... Feathers are flying in municipalities across the country where laws restrict backyard chickens or other animals that people might want to raise for food. In some cases, they begin as pets and end as dinner, much to the horror of children. Other people raise chickens outright as meat sources and signal that by calling their outdoor residence the dinner coop. Still others keep chickens as pets, harvest the daily egg from each hen, and marvel at the foods richness, over and over again. These arent Old MacDonald wannabes looking to raise backyard animals for a lark. Their ranks include inner-city residents who work on urban farms and other modern-day homesteaders who want to save money on groceries, control a sustainable food supply, and be greener too. These people are the reason the magazine Backyard Poultry has a bimonthly print run of 100,000, and its publisher Dave Belanger told the Washington Post: Chickens are Americas cool new pet. For more analysis and insights log on to the B2B page of SupermarketGuru.com. The Lempert Report uploads right here every Thursday. To reach me directly, please email me at Phil@SupermarketGuru.com For information on New Products, visit our weekly videocast: http://www.ratefoods.com

Jun 15, 2009 Watch Video

A Retail Opportunity - The Lempert Report

The Lempert Report Food News: Marketing, analysis, issues & trends and the impact on food and retail environments, specifically for the B2B food world with reporting and commentary on consumer and retailing trends by Phil Lempert. Phil can predict the future —and then help businesses and consumers understand it. For more than 25 years, Lempert, an expert analyst on consumer behavior, marketing trends, new products and the changing retail landscape, has identified and explained impending trends to consumers and some of the most prestigious companies worldwide. Known as The Supermarket Guru®, http://www.supermarketguru.com, Lempert is a distinguished author and speaker who alerts customers and business leaders to impending corporate and consumer trends, and empowers them to make educated purchasing and marketing decisions. To see more of The Lempert Report visit: http://www.thelempertreport.com The Lempert Report for Thursday June 4, 2009 Time for retailers to step up Its time for food stores to step up and help struggling households in ways that go beyond promotional savings at the shelf. With the US unemployment rate at a 26-year high, many families that sustained supermarkets so well in good times now need help from the retailers selling them what they need to survive. Club memberships and sales are helpful but limited. Deals dont always conform with consumers needs in a particular week. Our economic challenges present an opportunity for retailers to differentiate themselves in a most meaningful way. Truffles seem to be the new it ingredient. They are being added to just about everything in white table cloth restaurants these days. The problem? Truffles can easily jack up the price of spaghetti to $100 a plate. Fungusamongus truffle mustard to the rescue. Made from 6% black truffles, it could well be one of the hottest new products on your shelves and one of best investments for your shoppers taste buds. Yes there is only just over 3 oz in this little jar, but one whiff of the aroma will convince you to add this SKU. The initial bite is almost all mustard, but a few seconds later the black truffle taste comes through loud and clear. Retails for $16.95. Retailers and World Ocean Day 2009 Jeremy Piven recently made headlines when he gave up his Broadway gig in Speed-the-Plow, and blamed mercury toxicity on eating large amounts of sushi. The idea of mercury poisoning from eating certain kinds of fish is not new. Through the years, stories about health risks for moms-to-be, nursing mothers and young children have dominated headlines. The trouble is, the headlines have rarely spurred the kind of regulatory reform, consumer guidance, or standardized industry practices that would protect the health of consumers, as well as the health of our domestic seafood industry. Seafood suppliers, food stores and regulators have much to address in a unified way. The Future of 100-Calorie Packs Once the darlings of center-store, the 100-calorie packs for cookies, crackers and other snacks seem suddenly out of touch with todays economic realities. The sales will fall in 2009, three reasons will have pushed them over the edge: • First, a single pack lacked ample food to satisfy many, which drove consumers to eat two or three packs at a time. Chances are they also felt guilt due to their inability to be happy with just one—and who needed that. • Second, the recession gripped everyones budget, and led shoppers to calculate the high per-ounce premium they were paying for the convenience of grab-and-go packs. They decided theyd rather buy regular-size food packages instead, and spend the few extra minutes to make their own small packs using plastic sandwich bags. • Third, people grew greener and began to look at these 100-calorie packs as examples of over-packaging thats not environmentally sound. Opting for other products instead is a simple choice that favors the Earth. For more analysis and insights log on to the B2B page of SupermarketGuru.com. The Lempert Report uploads right here every Thursday. To reach me directly, please email me at Phil@SupermarketGuru.com For information on New Products, visit our weekly videocast: http://www.ratefoods.com/

Jun 01, 2009 Watch Video

Who Eats Healthy - The Lempert Report

The Lempert Report Food News: Marketing, analysis, issues & trends and the impact on food and retail environments, specifically for the B2B food world with reporting and commentary on consumer and retailing trends by Phil Lempert. Phil can predict the future —and then help businesses and consumers understand it. For more than 25 years, Lempert, an expert analyst on consumer behavior, marketing trends, new products and the changing retail landscape, has identified and explained impending trends to consumers and some of the most prestigious companies worldwide. Known as The Supermarket Guru®, http://www.supermarketguru.com, Lempert is a distinguished author and speaker who alerts customers and business leaders to impending corporate and consumer trends, and empowers them to make educated purchasing and marketing decisions. To see more of The Lempert Report visit: http://www.thelempertreport.com The Lempert Report for Thursday May 28, 2009 The cost of healthy eating, a new, premium, boxed wine, nicotine in mushrooms and first, getting to the root of the honeybees' troubles. The challenges to the honeybees are certainly real, and a new report in the periodical Current Biology, finds that farmers worldwide had tripled their reliance on domesticated honeybees over the past half-century. And over the same time frame, the global population of managed honeybee hives has increased approximately 45%, according to data from the Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations. While about 35% of Europes food crops rely on bees to pollinate them, last year proved fatal to about 30% of Europes 13.6 million hives. The situation has grown dire enough in the U.S. for Wymans of Maine, a blueberry grower-marketer, to import 5 million honeybees to guarantee pollination of its crop this year. That is about 10,000 hives that will pollinate more than 7,000 acres of wild blueberry crop in Maine and on Price Edward Island. Black Box Wines is trying to change the attitude of wine drinkers. For about $25 for a 3 liter box, Black Box is looking to upgrade the palate, and the amount spent, for those who might already be buying wines in similar packaging from the likes of Franzia. But these wines, New Zealand Sauvignon Blanc, Monterey County Chardonnay, Central Coast Shiraz and California Cabernet are a step above in flavor and have won a number of gold medals. Black Box comes to us from Constellation Wine - the folks you may know better as Robert Mondavi. Eating Healthy: the key It comes as no surprise that women of higher socioeconomic status spend more on better-quality diets, according to a recent study from the University of Washingtons Nutritional Sciences Program. The study, which looked at energy and nutrient intakes for both men and women, found that diets of higher nutrient content were more costly per kilocalorie and consumed by persons of higher educational and income levels. There has been much discussion of late questioning the premise that eating healthy costs more -- this study puts the record straight. According to the research, eating a nutritious diet carries a price premium. Current dietary guidance does not take cost into account. The researchers urge that if we don't address the monetary hurdles, simply telling people to eat more fruit and vegetables won't accomplish the goal. Although income level contributed to spending on higher-priced, healthier items, the biggest predictor of both energy density and energy cost was education level. The two higher education groups spent nearly $1 per 2,000 kcal more than the reference group, those individuals with less than a four year college education -- suggesting that consumers in these categories could have better access to nutrition information. These findings provide a great opportunity for retailers to distinguish themselves, get the word out on health education and participate in the overhauling of our food system; which places too much emphasis on calories over nutrients. The latest Food Safety Nightmare: Nicotine The European Food Safety Authority discovered the presence of highly detectable nicotine levels in mushrooms, which sent red flags sailing in the European Commission. Although this phenomenon currently only concerns Europe, it is still of great interest to consumers and brands in the U.S. Of the wild mushrooms, all of which were imported from China, and was tested by European food companies in 2008, a whopping 99% contained levels of nicotine that exceeded maximum residue limits or MRL -- the safety limit set by individual countries regarding tolerable levels of pesticide residue on foods. For more analysis and insights log on to the B2B page of SupermarketGuru.com. The Lempert Report uploads right here every Thursday. To reach me directly, please email me at Phil@SupermarketGuru.com For information on New Products, visit our weekly videocast: http://www.ratefoods.com

May 26, 2009 Watch Video

Electronic Shopping Lists - The Lempert Report

The Lempert Report Food News: Marketing, analysis, issues & trends and the impact on food and retail environments, specifically for the B2B food world with reporting and commentary on consumer and retailing trends by Phil Lempert. Phil can predict the future —and then help businesses and consumers understand it. For more than 25 years, Lempert, an expert analyst on consumer behavior, marketing trends, new products and the changing retail landscape, has identified and explained impending trends to consumers and some of the most prestigious companies worldwide. Known as The Supermarket Guru®, http://www.supermarketguru.com, Lempert is a distinguished author and speaker who alerts customers and business leaders to impending corporate and consumer trends, and empowers them to make educated purchasing and marketing decisions. To see more of The Lempert Report visit: http://www.thelempertreport.com The Lempert Report for Thursday May 21, 2009 The electronic shopping list has come of age. Daily life is hectic, shoppers are juggling work, school, children, planning and preparing meals and fitting in that recommended dose of "fun". In the current age of technology its a shocker that grocery lists havent changed since our great grandparents first started shopping in supermarkets. The grocery list tools from Webvan or Peapod just haven't morphed into the mainstream. Well, surprise, surprise, the change is here. Many consumers are visiting shopping-list services on the web to create concise lists before heading to the market. Personal grocery lists can either be printed or accessed through different media such as email, text and even instant messaging. Some online services require registration, where visitors set up a username and password, allowing different family members or roommates to sign on from different locations and make amendments. Kraft's iFood app for the iPhone is one of the most easy to use and advanced shopping list tools - and their latest version puts shoppers in command of their shopping experience with a simple easy to use smart shopping list with store locator feature. Some sites allow you to save recipes or ingredients needed for themed evenings like taco night; and with one click all of your pre-saved ingredients are added to the list. One especially notable site, Grocerywiz.com, allows you to make your list and then see all of the coupons available in selected categories- several clicks later, youre on your way to being organized and saving money. For those who desire a more straightforward and basic website, Knotler.com is a great choice and can also be shared and accessed from different locations. Ziplist.com allows users to save individual ingredients for recipes or themed dinners and can then be amended by family members in different locations and accessed through all types of media. Fresh Direct with their "one click recipe shopping list" tool proved that you can increase order size by offering shoppers a fool proof meal solution they can make at home. There are dozens more, which begs the question to be asked - just when will supermarket retailers add these tools to their own websites? Man Bait Today is the final day of the All Candy Expo being held in Chicago. It is one of my favorite food expos loaded with more new products than even a class of 7 year olds could eat. But here is a new one for adults - its called Man Bait -just 30 calories, all natural, made without corn syrup or any artificial preservatives, additives, flavors or colors. Man Bait is a combination of real smoky bacon bits and maple syrup; all for just 50 cents a pop.Is Salt the Petrified Elephant in the FDA's Cafeteria? Reducing sodium intake has been on the agenda of health advocates for decades. "Killer Salt," written in 1977, first exposed the negative health effects of dietary salt to the general public. Americans continue to consume more and more salt; in this case, individuals are not entirely to blame. The FDA also deserves a huge amount of blame. The American Heart Association recommends consuming less than 2,300 mg of sodium per day, and less than 1,500 mg for middle-aged and older adults as well as individuals with hypertension and African-Americans. This means that about half of the US population is advised to consume less than 1,500 mg of sodium per day. To put some perspective on it, one teaspoon of salt contains 2,300 mg of sodium.In order to include the claim that a product is "healthy" the FDA mandates that individual food items must not exceed 480 mg sodium per serving and a ready meal type product must not exceed 600 mg sodium per serving.For more analysis and insights log on to the B2B page of SupermarketGuru.com. The Lempert Report uploads right here every Thursday. To reach me directly, please email me at Phil@SupermarketGuru.com For information on New Products, visit our weekly videocast: http://www.ratefoods.com/

May 19, 2009 Watch Video

Swine Flu - The Lempert Report

The Lempert Report Food News: Marketing, analysis, issues & trends and the impact on food and retail environments, specifically for the B2B food world with reporting and commentary on consumer and retailing trends by Phil Lempert. Phil can predict the future —and then help businesses and consumers understand it. For more than 25 years, Lempert, an expert analyst on consumer behavior, marketing trends, new products and the changing retail landscape, has identified and explained impending trends to consumers and some of the most prestigious companies worldwide. Known as The Supermarket Guru®, http://www.supermarketguru.com, Lempert is a distinguished author and speaker who alerts customers and business leaders to impending corporate and consumer trends, and empowers them to make educated purchasing and marketing decisions. To see more of The Lempert Report visit: http://www.thelempertreport.com The Lempert Report for Thursday May 14, 2009 This week in Food Sense: The Magic Soybean As you drive through the countryside in the coming weeks, youll see farmers out and about in their fields. They are planting all kinds of seeds, from smaller-acre crops, like vegetables, to large-acre crops like wheat and field corn. The U.S. Department of Agriculture predicts that farmers will be planting more soybeans in 2009 than in any other year in our nations history. Farmers in more than 30 states grow the crop. The list is of the uses for soybeans extends far beyond the supermarket; the reason is that soybeans are one of the most versatile crops grown here in the United States. The seemingly nondescript soybean is composed of two basic, but valuable, components: the meal and the oil. One of the most important developments for the food world is the creation of ways to produce an even healthier oil from soybeans using the tools of breeding and biotechnology, with varieties that boast lower saturated fat and other properties important for healthier frying and baking. As more consumers understand the connection between what we eat and our health, there is little question that one of the the most positive steps to eliminate trans fats in our diet rest with soybeans.Crystal Light's new strategy is to work from within Crystal Light Skin Essentials is much more than a brand extension - it is a foray into the world of beauty for the beverage maker with a new formula developed with dermotoligists and nutritionists that is loaded with antioxidents, leutin and zeaxanthin (zeea - zan-thin) all designed to nourish the skin by enhancing elasticity and hydration. And all for jsut about 50 cents a serving. Just who overreacted to the reports of swine flu ? Was it shoppers or the media? While it is true that The Centers for Disease Control has confirmed over 400 cases of swine flu across the United States. and while the spread of this disease must be taken seriously, the fear of the swine flu has been enough to prompt some irrational acts including Egypt beginning a government-ordered slaughter of the nation's 300,000 pigs, despite the country having not a single confirmed case of the illness, which isn't spread by pigs, We conducted a SupermarketGuru quick poll to find out how at risk our readers feel when it comes to contracting this virus, and what precautions they are taking to avoid the virus. Here are the results: When asked, "How would you describe your attitude toward the recent outbreak of swine flu?" our readers showed little sign of extreme fear with 47% saying they are "slightly concerned" and 24% saying "moderately concerned." Twenty-four percent also said they are "not concerned at all," only five percent said they are "highly concerned." When asked, "Which of the following precautionary actions will you take to avoid swine flu?", 88% said they will "wash hands more," 48% will "avoid people who sneeze or cough," 33% will "avoid crowds," only two percent said they will "wear masks." Americans seem to very clear on the fact that you cannot get swine flu from eating pork. We asked our readers, "Do you feel it is safe to eat pork products?" Ninety-three percent answered "yes," and only seven percent answered "no." If we are ever to build consumer confidence in our food supply, the answer must be steeped in facts that are clearly communicated and without the hype that seems to be pervasive these days- especially on cable TV, which seems to be searching for whatever will bring them viewers. Last time I checked their mission was slightly different - to inform with correct information in order to allow people to make intelligent decisions for themselves. For more analysis and insights log on to the B2B page of SupermarketGuru.com. The Lempert Report uploads right here every Thursday. To reach me directly, please email me at: Phil@SupermarketGuru.com For information on New Products, visit our weekly videocast: http://www.ratefoods.com

May 12, 2009 Watch Video

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