The Lempert Report ®

In Food Sense: A long-term goal of the new agriculture-conservation alliance - The Lempert Report

The Lempert Report Food News: Marketing, analysis, issues & trends and the impact on food and retail environments, specifically for the B2B food world with reporting and commentary on consumer and retailing trends by Phil Lempert. Phil can predict the future —and then help businesses and consumers understand it. For more than 25 years, Lempert, an expert analyst on consumer behavior, marketing trends, new products and the changing retail landscape, has identified and explained impending trends to consumers and some of the most prestigious companies worldwide. Known as The Supermarket Guru®, http://www.supermarketguru.com, Lempert is a distinguished author and speaker who alerts customers and business leaders to impending corporate and consumer trends, and empowers them to make educated purchasing and marketing decisions. To see more of The Lempert Report visit: http://www.thelempertreport.com The Lempert Report for Thursday January 22, 2009. Tonite is the Product of the Year USA Award Ceremony. Held in 22 countries throughout the world, Product of the Year now comes to the US. 16 Products will win the coveted award which historically has increased sales, in some cases by 150%. Log in tomorrow to the B2B home page on supermarketguru.com to see a complete list of the winners. In Food Sense: A long-term goal of the new agriculture-conservation alliance The worlds food production will need to double to keep pace with population growth of 3 billion people between now and 2050, and this doubling must come without negative impact on the environment and society. So warn the founders of a novel group of experts who have come together to help make this happen under the auspices of Field to Market, the Keystone Alliance for Sustainable Agriculture. This group of farmers, agribusiness, food companies, retailers and conservation groups first Environmental Resource Indicators Report, just issued, shows that agriculture production has been increasing efficiency over the past two decades. The initial index shows that soil-loss efficiency has risen by 30% for corn, soybean, cotton and wheat. Energy use is down by nearly 40%. Irrigated water use has dropped 20%, while carbon emissions have dropped by about a third for these three crops. the report also notes that: • Agriculture is already the predominant user of all habitable land and 70% of fresh water. • By 2030, grain-producing land per capita will drop to just a third of what it was in 1950. • In just a decade, we will need 17% more water than is available to feed the world, a prediction by the World Water Council. Country of Origin Labeling (COOL) It was in 2002 that the debate began over whether Country of Origin Labeling (COOL) should be implemented, and now following its inclusion in the 2002 and 2008 Farm Bills, the mandatory labeling requirements have been announced and will go in effect on March 16th of this year. The rule covers muscle cuts and ground beef, lamb, chicken, goat and pork; wild and farm-raised fish and shellfish; perishable agricultural commodities (specifically fresh and frozen fruits and vegetables); macadamia nuts; pecans; ginseng and peanuts. Foods that fall under the rule must be labeled at retail, and for fish and shellfish, that means form of production wild or farm raised. Processed foods that have undergone a chemical change such as cooking, curing or smoking are excluded, and food service establishments such as restaurants, cafeterias, bars, lunchrooms do not have to comply. From a consumer perspective, SupermarketGuru conducted a poll back in 2005 to investigate how important COOL was to shoppers. An overwhelming, 93 percent of respondents said it should be labeled. And, as these respondents believe it is their right to have this information. In our latest NGA Consumer Panel Survey to be released on February 5th at the NGA Convention - the consumer response to the same question is even higher. Copies of the final rule and additional information are on display on line at ams.usda.gov/COOL. To reach me directly, please email me at Phil@SupermarketGuru.com For information on New Products, visit our weekly videocast: http://www.ratefoods.com/

Jan 21, 2009 Watch Video

No MSG now tops $1 billion -The Lempert Report

The Lempert Report Food News: Marketing, analysis, issues & trends and the impact on food and retail environments, specifically for the B2B food world with reporting and commentary on consumer and retailing trends by Phil Lempert. Phil can predict the future —and then help businesses and consumers understand it. For more than 25 years, Lempert, an expert analyst on consumer behavior, marketing trends, new products and the changing retail landscape, has identified and explained impending trends to consumers and some of the most prestigious companies worldwide. Known as The Supermarket Guru®, http://www.supermarketguru.com, Lempert is a distinguished author and speaker who alerts customers and business leaders to impending corporate and consumer trends, and empowers them to make educated purchasing and marketing decisions. To see more of The Lempert Report visit: http://www.thelempertreport.com No-MSG a $1 billion opportunity Many people associate monosodium glutamate (MSG) with Chinese restaurants, where diners frequently ask that none be put in their foods. Relatively few know that food and beverage makers use MSG in a wide array of foods, since it is part of other ingredients whose names give no hint of its presence. To name a few: calcium caseinate, dry milk powder, hydrolyzed soy protein, and yeast nutrient. The FDA does not require MSG to appear on food labels, even though over the past half-century, research has suggested the flavor enhancer could add to health risks ranging from blindness to migraines, nausea, joint pain, sleep disorders, heart irregularities and more. Its widespread presence in processed foods surprises millions who can ill afford to ingest it because it could potentially worsen their existing conditions. By claiming no-MSG on package labels in numerous categories, food processors have created a $1 billion-plus niche and helped consumers make wiser product selections for their individual circumstances. According to Nielsen LabelTrends data, sales of no-MSG products have risen in each of the past four years, over the past 12 months; a 9.0% increase to $1.2 billion in U.S. food, drug and mass merchandiser stores (excluding Walmart). Activity in no-MSG product labeling is consistently strong. There are 3,440 such active UPCs these included 389 new products introduced during the last year, approximately the same number as introduced each year of the past four. There are 5 categories in which no-MSG product sales exceeded $100 million in this past year. Ready-to-serve prepared foods, soup, packaged meat, frozen prepared foods, and ironically enough, spices/seasonings/extracts. It is January and that means diets! The gift no one can give, that would surely top many Christmas wish lists, is the ability to lose weight without working at it. So instead, people are heading to their supermarkets and drug chains to buy hope in a bottle; in the form of appetite suppressants and diet aids, and that is despite the loose science around them, and serious documented health risks that have stained the weight loss business in the past. According to Nielsen, in the 52 weeks ended November 29, 2008, these shoppers willingly paid more than $400 million on these products in U.S. food, drug and mass merchandiser stores (excluding Walmart). Where is the money going? Appetite suppressants is number one At $142.1 million, up 11.9% in dollars and almost 7 percent in volume. However, in previous years, the increases ranged from 50 to 175%. The economy may have had a lot to do with the growth slowdown. Sales of appetite suppressants were bounding ahead in excess of 200% in four-week periods through May of 2008, and then they hit a wall. Since June, every four-week period posted a downturn over the same year-ago period. Consumption of appetite suppressants are evenly dispersed among ten different BehaviorStage households identified by Spectra, the highest indexes were: established couples with no children in cosmopolitan centers (147 index), small-scale families in comfortable country environments (143), empty nesters in affluent suburban spreads (141), and younger bustling families in cosmopolitan centers (132), In the big picture, since 2004, the diet aids-complete nutritional segment has lost more than $100 million in dollar sales, while the appetite suppressants segment has gained nearly $130 million. The story is not so much about growth in weight-loss expenditures as it is about a shift in the products people are buying. To reach me directly, please email me at Phil@SupermarketGuru.com For information on New Products, visit our weekly videocast: http://www.ratefoods.com/

Jan 14, 2009 Watch Video

Retail struggles to find pharmacists -The Lempert Report

The Lempert Report Food News: Marketing, analysis, issues & trends and the impact on food and retail environments, specifically for the B2B food world with reporting and commentary on consumer and retailing trends by Phil Lempert. Phil can predict the future —and then help businesses and consumers understand it. For more than 25 years, Lempert, an expert analyst on consumer behavior, marketing trends, new products and the changing retail landscape, has identified and explained impending trends to consumers and some of the most prestigious companies worldwide. Known as The Supermarket Guru®, http://www.supermarketguru.com, Lempert is a distinguished author and speaker who alerts customers and business leaders to impending corporate and consumer trends, and empowers them to make educated purchasing and marketing decisions. To see more of The Lempert Report visit: http://www.thelempertreport.com The Lempert Report for Thursday January 8, 2009. Retail struggles to find pharmacists For all the unemployment shaking the country today, theres one profession thats begging for recruits—one thats respected and well-compensated, and an increasing part of the daily ritual for people 50 and older, who take seven times more medications than younger people. How bad is the problem? In 2001, the non-profit Pharmacy Manpower Project said that by the year 2020, our nations supply of pharmacists will likely fall short of the need by 157,000. Besides thin coverage, it seems in that sort of operating environment, medication errors are sure to slip by. As the incoming Obama Administration sets high healthcare priorities we can only hope that the agenda starts with receruitment and training. SALES OF READY TO EAT IS UP, AT THE EXPENSE OF QSRs Supermarkets are growing their foodservice sales at the direct expense of quick-service restaurants. According to new research by NPD Group, the dollars seem to be coming from typically unexpected dayparts: afternoon snacks and morning meals. To put it in perspective,retail food, drug, discount, department stores and wholesale clubs pumped out only 6% of the approximate 62 billion commercial foodservice meals and snacks consumed in a year. Convenience stores alone generated 7% covering the 12 months ended August 2008. This week on Food Sense: the WWF Focuses on the enemy we dont see. And Im not talking about the World Wrestling Foundation! The environment, they say, is already stressed by unsustainable development, climate change and pollution.Consumptive demands are rising.Riots erupting as a result of soaring food prices may only be a taste of things to come if we fail to address this growing imbalance between what humanity consumes and what nature, in its declining state, can provide. To head this off they proposes a four-step plan to President-elect Obama: 1. Confront the challenge of climate change. Secure a new treaty, curb deforestation, lower greenhouse gas emissions and create a low-carbon economy. 2. Ensure food for all. Reconsider ethanol, help develop performance standards, do more to assist poor countries agriculturally, reform fisheries management. 3. Secure water for life. Make freshwater availability a strategic priority, establish water security through science and policies. 4. Protect nature and manage resources sustainably. Include conservation and sustainability in our foreign assistance programs, invest in our natural assets, engage China on green issues. The essence of the plan -- is for the United States to lead the world in confronting critical environmental challenges, and restore the integrity of science to our policy and decisionmaking. To reach me directly, please email me at Phil@SupermarketGuru.com For information on New Products, visit our weekly videocast: http://www.ratefoods.com/

Jan 07, 2009 Watch Video

5 Trends for 2009 - The Lempert Report

The Lempert Report Food News: Marketing, analysis, issues & trends and the impact on food and retail environments, specifically for the B2B food world with reporting and commentary on consumer and retailing trends by Phil Lempert. Phil can predict the future —and then help businesses and consumers understand it. For more than 25 years, Lempert, an expert analyst on consumer behavior, marketing trends, new products and the changing retail landscape, has identified and explained impending trends to consumers and some of the most prestigious companies worldwide. Known as The Supermarket Guru®, http://www.supermarketguru.com, Lempert is a distinguished author and speaker who alerts customers and business leaders to impending corporate and consumer trends, and empowers them to make educated purchasing and marketing decisions. To see more of The Lempert Report visit: http://www.thelempertreport.com The Lempert Report for Wednesday December 24, 2008. We wish our viewers and readers a Happy Holiday and this week post our report on Wednesday in respect for the Christmas holiday. We will resume our regular schedule the first week in January 2009. Each new year brings change, and this one will be no exception. With a shifting administration, weakened economy and the increase of unpredictable weather patterns, the year ahead is ripe with possibilities. Here are our top five forecasts for the food industry in 2009. No. 5: Small Store Formats Now that Walmart, Tesco, Albertsons and Safeway are expanding into the smaller store format, we can expect to see more changes in how people shop. In the search for convenience, shoppers will gravitate to stores that offer pre-assembled meals and a smaller selection of needed items. Their hectic lifestyles also go hand-in-hand with the trend to shop more often, and for fewer items on shorter grocery trips. No. 4: Politics and Food Safety When Barak Obama takes the reigns as President, we can expect to see changes in the arena of food safety. As Obamas Secretary of Health and Human Services, Tom Daschle will be in charge of the FDA. It will be his role to help improve the agencys credibility as we continue to face the challenge of keeping both our imports and domestic products safe. Daschle is also expected to take aim at the nations health care crisis. No. 3: Local vs. Locale While buying locally grown continues to be an important trend, buying by locale is also starting to come into play in a major way. Why? Local goods help reduce greenhouse gas emissions, but they arent necessarily as food safe. Products grown in the U.S. and identified by locale (city, state, etc.) are helping to build a more traceable bridge between local and imported goods. No. 2: Food Brands The increase of private label brands is helping consumers keep some money in their wallets, which is a good thing, in the short term, for shoppers. However, store brands tend to follow the trends of what larger food companies are doing, we see the risk in expanding store brands as a potential loss of innovation. Much like we have seen in Detroit, without keeping ahead of the trends and creating new exciting products, our retail stores could become as exciting as a used car showroom. In order for brands to succeed and capture shoppers' trust and loyalty, they will have to continually push the envelope. No. 1: Weather and the Economy Fluctuating weather patterns are making it harder to predict crop output each season, which makes it hard to plan what to plant and how much to grow. And the unpredictable economy isnt helping matters. Retailers, consumers and farmers will need to become more flexible as weather and economic changes force the food industry to expect the unexpected. We at The Lempert Report wish you, your family and friends the happiest of Holidays and look forward to great things in the coming food year. To reach me directly, please email me at Phil@SupermarketGuru.com For information on New Products, visit our weekly videocast: http://www.ratefoods.com/

Dec 23, 2008 Watch Video

Did you ever wonder how far could smarter food systems take the world? - The Lempert Report

The Lempert Report Food News: Marketing, analysis, issues & trends and the impact on food and retail environments, specifically for the B2B food world with reporting and commentary on consumer and retailing trends by Phil Lempert. Phil can predict the future —and then help businesses and consumers understand it. For more than 25 years, Lempert, an expert analyst on consumer behavior, marketing trends, new products and the changing retail landscape, has identified and explained impending trends to consumers and some of the most prestigious companies worldwide. Known as The Supermarket Guru®,http://www.supermarketguru.com, Lempert is a distinguished author and speaker who alerts customers and business leaders to impending corporate and consumer trends, and empowers them to make educated purchasing and marketing decisions. To see more of The Lempert Report visit http://www.thelempertreport.com The Lempert Report for Thursday December 18, 2008. Did you ever wonder how far could smarter food systems take the world? After all the dumb things mankind has done to hurt the planet; cause species to go extinct, poison our natural resources, advance global warming, and even poison each other...we are now being told we are not all bad. The essence of IBMs new Smarter Planet initiative is that (man-made) interconnected technologies are changing the way the world works. The company is referring to systems and processes that enable physical goods to be developed, made, bought and sold; services to be delivered, and everything - that is people, money, oil, water -- to move. One outcome, they contend, is smarter global food systems, which is being discussed in a series of their ads. IBM is also about to issue findings of its international consumer study on food-safety concerns. IBMs thought-leadership message on food safety first depicts how the countries the U.S. relies on for food supply, lack consistent standards of quality, processes and accountability. Inefficiencies in food safety, sustainability and cost then lead to opportunities for a smarter global food system. They say in the ad that in the U.S. alone, 76 million cases of food-borne illnesses occur each year. Imports account for nearly 60% of the fruits and vegetables we consume, and 75% of the seafood. Yet only 1% of those foods are inspected before they cross our shores. One example the ad illustrates is how IBM is helping norways largest food supplier use RFID technology to trace meat and poultry from the farm through the supply chain to the store shelf. The lines blur: A smart pill from a TV manufacturer that sounds a lot like a movie with Martin Short. Imagine that drug researchers today, and clinicians in the future, will have a precise ability to pinpoint drug release within a patients body to achieve maximum therapeutic effect with minimum unpleasantness. A new intelligent pill is in prototype from Philips electronics, the Dutch manufacturer of televisions, cordless phones and other communications devices. And it just might be a device that comes along at the right time to treat the increasing incidence of Crohns Disease, colitis, colon cancer and other digestive tract disorders. It is called the iPill, what else?, with a unique electronic drug delivery system. The size of a multivitamin, a person swallows it with food or water as they normally would do. As it is carried naturally through the gut, it sends its location to a control unit outside the body, via a wireless transceiver. It also tells the temperature and acidity of its surroundings. pH value rises sharply when exiting the stomach, and becomes progressively alkaline from the upper intestine moving forward. When the iPill reaches target location, a pre-programmed microprocessor activates the iPills miniature drug pump to deliver a burst, progressive release or multi-location dosing. Similar robotic capsules with built-in cameras have been developed for colon endoscopy, but the iPill is the first to be able to deliver drugs, And by the way, the movie was called "Innerspace" and was released in July 1987 and also starred Meg Ryan and Dennis Quaid. To reach me directly, please email me at Phil@SupermarketGuru.com For information on New Products, visit our weekly videocast: http://www.ratefoods.com/

Dec 17, 2008 Watch Video

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