Great taste motivates to eat salads and dressings

Articles
November 18, 2010

Great taste motivates to eat salads and dressings

A recent study from the CDC’s National Fruit and Vegetable Alliance says that Americans are not eating enough fruits and veggies.

A recent study from the CDC’s National Fruit and Vegetable Alliance says that Americans are not eating enough fruits and veggies. In fact, the report shows that only 10 percent are eating the recommended amount. However, a SupermarketGuru quick poll conducted over the last month shows that 50 percent are eating salad several times a week either at home or in a restaurant, and 27 percent say that they eat salad every day or almost every day. And even though 20 percent claim that their top health concern is obesity, managing weight is not the top reason people eat salad, according to the SG poll. Forty-one percent say they eat salad because it tastes good, 29 percent eat salad because it’s healthy, and only 13 percent eat salad to manage weight. 
 
What makes salad taste so good? Perhaps it’s the wide variety of flavors (and mouth feel) salad dressings offer today that make eating a salad more appealing.  In fact, 32 percent say they purchase salad dressing once a month. (A 16 fl oz. bottle of salad dressing contains about 16 servings.) Fourteen percent say they purchase salad dressing as often as once every two weeks.  Only two percent say the never buy salad dressing. 
 
Just as more shoppers indicated that they eat salad more for the taste than health or weight management, 46 percent report that they most often purchase regular salad dressings as opposed to alternative healthier options; most likely due to the less satisfying taste. Thirty-nine percent say they most often purchase reduced calorie/reduced fat dressings, and 13 percent most often purchase fat free dressings. 
 
What flavors are most popular? When asked what variety of salad dressing they purchase most often, the number one answer was Ranch (24%). Coming in second place was Balsamic Vinaigrette (21%), followed by Other Vinaigrettes (18%), Italian (17%), Blue Cheese (7%), Honey Dijon/Mustard (5%), Caesar (4%), French (3%), Thousand Island (2%), and Poppyseed (2%).
 
In a separate question, the SG poll asked readers what type of mayonnaise they purchase most often. Forty-five percent purchase regular mayonnaise most often as opposed to healthier options. Thirty-two percent more often buy reduced calorie/reduced fat mayonnaise, followed by mayonnaise made with canola oil (10%) and fat free mayonnaise (9%).