D’Agostino gets savings right!

Articles
October 08, 2009

D’Agostino gets savings right!

Here’s an upbeat, refreshing counter to the broad-scale discounts on thousands of SKUs that are blanketing some of the nation’s largest supermarket operators.

Here’s an upbeat, refreshing counter to the broad-scale discounts on thousands of SKUs that are blanketing some of the nation’s largest supermarket operators.

A ‘Managers Gone Wild’ campaign at New York City’s D’Agostino chain delivers savings as high as 75% on meal staples with a D’Ag Rewards Card, and does it in a way that captures the street-smart, fast-paced life of Manhattanites who value convenience as well as savings. In a clever twist, the weeklong campaign that broke yesterday also features the smiling faces of four department managers announcing their hottest deals in city-speak. They don’t sound like cab drivers; they do sound enthusiastic to share the savings with shoppers.

“Fresh Express Salad Bags, only 99 cents. I haven’t gone this crazy since college,” boasts John Vasapoli, produce manager.

“Boneless Center Cut Pork Chops, just 99 cents per pound.  That is totally off the hook,” says Bob Fonti, meat manager.

“2-liter bottles of Coke, just 59 cents.  I never did anything like this before,” states Luigi Mucciacciaro, grocery manager.

“Meat and cheese combos, only $2.99 per pound.  Whoa, I gotta lay down for a minute,” kids Pat Golia, deli manager.

These are easy takeaway messages for the radio listeners (on six stations), newspaper readers (in five papers), Web viewers (banner ads), Blackberry and iPhone users (19,000 impressions per day) and in-store shoppers (delivery trunk carts, bags, cart signs, buttons, posters) to absorb. Other elements: rush-hour promoters on the subway and the streets of Manhattan, and contests.

It’s too easy to lower prices in a bid to build traffic, as others are doing in their margin-killing, suspicion-raising (“Have you been ripping me off all these years?”) way.  By contrast, this creative campaign suits its targeted shoppers in specific neighborhoods (local angle, local language), it brings fun to the table, and it brings a sense of immediacy because the savings event runs just one week. 

Moreover, by showing off some managers, D’Agostino portrays store staff as friendly, inviting and accessible to shoppers. People who appreciate the campaign’s lighter mood might be tempted to say, ‘Thanks for giving us a laugh and a boost in the wallet.’