Decaf Coffee Could be Boon to Diabetics

Articles
April 16, 2009

Decaf Coffee Could be Boon to Diabetics

The two most popular elements in coffee studies are caffeine and antioxidants. A new Dutch study, published online March 26 by Diabetes Care, supports the premise that two other elements, chlorogenic acid and trigonelline, may help diabetics tolerate glucose in the body. Previous studies have affirmed that high consumption of coffee may lower the risk of type 2 diabetes but this study, although small, explored phenolic compound chlorogenic acid and the vitamin B3 precursor trigonelline. They have previously been shown to reduce blood glucose concentrations only in animals. The study, on 15 overweight men, was designed to determine the acute effects of decaf coffee, cholorgenic acid, and trigonelline on glucose tolerance. A supplement of 12 grams of decaf coffee was used with 1 gram of chlorogenic acid, 500 mg of trigonelline compared to 1 gram of mannitol for the placebo in the randomized cross-over trial. The researchers examined the effects on both glucose and insulin concentrations and, compared with a placebo, the elements demonstrated "significant reductions" in glucose and insulin 15 minutes after the oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT), a two-hour procedure commonly used to diagnose diabetes. "This finding is consistent with the hypothesis that these compounds may contribute to the putative beneficial effect of coffee on the development of type 2 diabetes," the article asserts.

The two most popular elements in coffee studies are caffeine and antioxidants. A new Dutch study, published online March 26 by Diabetes Care, supports the premise  that two other elements, chlorogenic acid and trigonelline, may help diabetics tolerate glucose in the body. Previous studies have affirmed that high consumption of coffee may lower the risk of type 2 diabetes but this study, although small, explored phenolic compound chlorogenic acid and the vitamin B3 precursor trigonelline. They have previously been shown to reduce blood glucose concentrations only in animals.

The study, on 15 overweight men, was designed to determine the acute effects of decaf coffee, cholorgenic acid, and trigonelline on glucose tolerance. A supplement of 12 grams of decaf coffee was used with 1 gram of chlorogenic acid, 500 mg of trigonelline compared to 1 gram of mannitol for the placebo in the randomized cross-over trial.

The researchers examined the effects on both glucose and insulin concentrations and, compared with a placebo, the elements demonstrated "significant reductions" in glucose and insulin 15 minutes after the oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT), a two-hour procedure commonly used to diagnose diabetes.

"This finding is consistent with the hypothesis that these compounds may contribute to the putative beneficial effect of coffee on the development of type 2 diabetes," the article asserts.

Researchers cautioned that the study's limitations included multiple tests conducted for different time points, increasing the likelihood of chance findings and difficult comparisons of the treatment's effects because a supplement was used versus brewed coffee which has substantially more of the two elements.

Type 2 diabetes has been increasing at what many doctors believe  is an alarming rate and Type 1 diabetes, the more serious of the two, is also increasing. The danger to overall health when the glucose tolerance is impaired is a greater resistance to insulin and an increased risk of cardiovascular disease. The American Diabetes Assn. estimates that 23.6 million people or 8% of the US population has been diagnosed with diabetes, and the prevalence has increased 13.5% from 2005-2007 which reflects both a rise in the disease and the increase in those who have sought out diagnosis.

Authors of the article include Aimee E. van Dijk, MSc, Margreet R. Othof, PhD, Joke C. Meeuse, MSc, Elin Seebus, MD, Rob J. Heine, MD, PhD, and Rob M. van Dam, PhD, who represent the Institute for Health Sciences, VU University Amsterdam; Department of Endocrinology, VU University Medical Center, Amsterdam; Department of Nutrition, Harvard School of Public Health; Channing Laboratory, Brigham and Women's Hospital, and Harvard Medical School, Boston. The Dutch Diabetes Research Foundation supported this study.