E-mail campaigns drive store trips and purchases

Articles
March 05, 2009

Are retailers better able to win store trips and purchases simply by currying favor through permission-based e-mail campaigns? When busy people say they sift through dozens or hundreds of e-mails a day, can the right store and brand messages rise from the clutter and draw enough attention to create a positive impact on offline behavior? A new nationwide survey of 1,517 consumers sought to decode this click-to-brick dimension and “demonstrate the offline implications and branding ‘halo’ effect of e-mail marketing,” said Kevin Mabley, senior vice president, Epsilon Strategic Services, part of Dallas-based Epsilon, which commissioned the study, done by ROI Research, Lancaster, PA. Their findings: • 56% that receive permission-based e-mail from retailers are likelier to buy from those stores • 52% think more favorably of the retailer because of the e-mails • 48% feel more loyal to the stores and their products

Are retailers better able to win store trips and purchases simply by currying favor through permission-based e-mail campaigns?

When busy people say they sift through dozens or hundreds of e-mails a day, can the right store and brand messages rise from the clutter and draw enough attention to create a positive impact on offline behavior?

A new nationwide survey of 1,517 consumers sought to decode this click-to-brick dimension and “demonstrate the offline implications and branding ‘halo’ effect of e-mail marketing,” said Kevin Mabley, senior vice president, Epsilon Strategic Services, part of Dallas-based Epsilon, which commissioned the study, done by ROI Research, Lancaster, PA.

Their findings:
•    56% that receive permission-based e-mail from retailers are likelier to buy from those stores
•    52% think more favorably of the retailer because of the e-mails
•    48% feel more loyal to the stores and their products

Reflecting a penchant for online communications by the respondent base, 87%
that receive permission-based e-mails said e-mail is “a great way to learn about new products,” and 63% said “they want to receive personalized content based on their website activity and past purchases.”

Respondents said they have taken the following actions after receiving permission-based e-mails from retailers:
•    88% download/print a coupon
•    79% click a link in an e-mail to learn more
•    75% buy a product online
•    69% research retail locations that carry a product
•    67% buy a product offline
•    60% try a new product for the first time
•    55% share a coupon or forward the e-mail
•    33% type/copy the URL into their browser

It’s been a long and winding road for retailers and CPG exploring ways to shape marquee and brand perception and shopping behavior through online means.  Brick-and-click has often meant click-and-miss in the past. SupermarketGuru.com believes, however, that targeted communications to receptive consumers (who’ve granted permission to receive e-mails) could be productive—especially if retailers have accurate e-mail addresses for their frequent shopper cardholders, and could smartly combine loyalty and e-mail initiatives to deliver more desired benefits and satisfy customers more.