Got Goat? A Thirst for Goat Milk Education

Articles
July 13, 2010

Got Goat? A Thirst for Goat Milk Education

Most Americans can quickly identify campaigns like 'Got Milk?' or 'California’s Happy Cows'. Goat milk producers have a strong message of their own: Goat’s milk delivers 15% more calcium with 25% more vitamin B6 and 47% more vitamin A and also is higher in minerals than cow’s milk with fewer calories.

Most Americans can quickly identify campaigns like 'Got Milk?' or 'California’s Happy Cows'. Goat milk producers have a strong message of their own: Goat’s milk delivers 15% more calcium with 25% more vitamin B6 and 47% more vitamin A and also is higher in minerals than cow’s milk with fewer calories.

What’s more, the natural buffering qualities of goat’s milk make it beneficial for people with ulcers and other stomach problems. It has more easily digestible, short and middle chain fats and protein solids than cow’s milk. Lactose-intolerant consumers can enjoy goat's milk products since they do not contain the alpha S1 casein protein which is the #1 allergen in dairy products. The increased digestibility of protein is also important for infants and children. Additionally, goat’s milk is considered to be “naturally homogenized” and is free of any recombinant growth hormones.

Several producers recently joined forces - Mary Keehn of Cypress Grove Chevre, Laura Howard of Laloo’s Goat’s Milk Ice Cream, and Jennifer Bice of Redwood Hill Farm & Creamery, and founded the consumer education group SuperGoat, to communicate the health and environmental benefits of goat’s milk to consumers through events and their website SuperGoat.org.
They hope to raise public awareness for, and understanding of, the many positive aspects of goats, (the wholesomeness and sound nutrition of goat's milk products, the smaller carbon hoof prints goats leave on our planet, and the humane treatment for the animals themselves as they are raised on small family farms versus factory farms), through education and cooperative marketing communications which will enhance the goat image as relevant for today, as an important part of our collective U.S. history, and give consumers reasons to consider goat products.

Goats are actually very smart, affectionate animals and who are browsers, not grazers, which means they are particular about their food, they even clear fire-hazardous dry brush and eat poison oak and aerate the soil where they browse. Goat products are not only good for us; they are good for the planet too.