It is the worst side of social networking

Articles
April 20, 2009

It is the worst side of social networking

When two Domino’s Pizza employees uploaded their prank video, shot to be perceived as a "behind the scenes" expose in the restaurant’s kitchen, little did they expect felony charges. Nor did Domino's - who did nothing wrong - expect more than a million disgusted viewers, and a public relations nightmare. Welcome to the new world of You Tube and other social video networks where just about anyone can post just about anything; with little thought for the consequences. That might just change after this. In the video posted, a Domino’s employee in Conover, N.C., prepared sandwiches for delivery. The mock video showed him putting cheese up his nose and nasal mucus on the sandwiches. By now the video has logged and estimated 2 million-plus views and has led to a number of online discussions about Domino’s, some true and some false. We all need to learn from Domino's unfortunate experience and realize that social media is now the norm, available to almost all, and moves at lightening fast speeds. We might all covet those great You Tube success stories, but this event underscores just how fragile a food or retail brand can be at the expense of a video camera in the wrong hands.

When two Domino’s Pizza employees uploaded their prank video, shot to be perceived as a "behind the scenes" expose in the restaurant’s kitchen, little did they expect felony charges. Nor did Domino's - who did nothing wrong - expect more than a million disgusted viewers, and a public relations nightmare.

Welcome to the new world of You Tube and other social video networks where just about anyone can post just about anything; with little thought for the consequences. That might just change after this.

In the video posted, a Domino’s employee in Conover, N.C., prepared sandwiches for delivery. The mock video showed him putting cheese up his nose and nasal mucus on the sandwiches. By now the video has logged and estimated 2 million-plus views and has led to a number of online discussions about Domino’s, some true and some false.

We all need to learn from Domino's unfortunate experience and realize that social media is now the norm, available to almost all, and moves at lightening fast speeds. We might all covet those great You Tube success stories, but this event underscores just how fragile a food or retail brand can be at the expense of a video camera in the wrong hands.

Domino's is doing the right thing. They are preparing a civil lawsuit, fired the two employees and are prepared to prosecute to the full extent of the law.

Expect more surveillance cameras to be installed in kitchens everywhere, and You Tube crisis management plans to be initiated.
Domino's CEO is now on You Tube and the company is doing its best to tell, and follow, the true story on Twitter.

And if you thought this is the work of young teens on their first job just goofing around - think again. Both culprits are over 30. The narrator, Kristy Hammonds apologized in an e-mail writing, “It was fake and I wish that everyone knew that!!!! I AM SOO SORRY!” As you should be, but that's just not enough.