Earth Day

Articles
April 22, 2009

It’s Earth Day! And, as environmental issues and climate changes are a hot topic these days, this is an important event for spreading awareness on what we as Americans can do to protect our planet and natural resources. Pioneered by Senator Gaylord Nelson in 1962, 2009’s Earth Day will mark the beginning of The Green Generation Campaign, which will also be the focus of the 40th anniversary of Earth Day in 2010. With negotiations for a new global climate agreement coming up in December, Earth Day 2009 must be a day of action and civic participation, to defend The Green Generation’sTM core principles: • Common dependency on fossil fuels, including coal. • An individual’s commitment to responsible, sustainable consumption. • Creation of a new green economy that lifts people out of poverty by creating millions of quality green jobs and transforms the global education system into a green one. Earth Day is a time to reflect on the consequences of our actions when we choose not to nurture and protect our planet. It’s a time to think about what product choices we make, reusing, recycling, and packaging. Knowledge is the key to respecting our environment. Here are a few tips on how you can contribute to the cause:

It’s Earth Day! And, as environmental issues and climate changes are a hot topic these days, this is an important event for spreading awareness on what we as Americans can do to protect our planet and natural resources.

Pioneered by Senator Gaylord Nelson in 1962, 2009’s Earth Day will mark the beginning of The Green Generation Campaign, which will also be the focus of the 40th anniversary of Earth Day in 2010. With negotiations for a new global climate agreement coming up in December, Earth Day 2009 must be a day of action and civic participation, to defend The Green Generation’sTM core principles:

•    Common dependency on fossil fuels, including coal.
•    An individual’s commitment to responsible, sustainable consumption.
•    Creation of a new green economy that lifts people out of poverty by creating millions of quality green jobs and transforms the global education system into a green one.

Earth Day is a time to reflect on the consequences of our actions when we choose not to nurture and protect our planet. It’s a time to think about what product choices we make, reusing, recycling, and packaging. Knowledge is the key to respecting our environment. Here are a few tips on how you can contribute to the cause:

A Dim Bulb - Your local hardware store probably sells a regular incandescent bulb for $2 or $3. Compare that to a compact fluorescent bulb that sells for about $15.00. No contest you say? Think again. Experts say you may buy 10 or more of the cheaper bulbs over ten years, compared to only one of the more expensive type. Now which looks better? 50 Simple Things You Can Do to Save the Earth recommends using compact fluorescent bulbs with solid state ballasts that fit into a regular light bulb socket, using 1/4 of the energy of an incandescent bulb while generating the same amount of light.

The Running Faucet - Do you leave the water running while you brush your teeth for 2 minutes? Then nearly ten gallons of water just slid down the drain. Remember, you PAY for that! Now, think about saving water when you shave, wash dishes, do laundry, water the lawn, wash the car, hose off the sidewalks.... avoid sending water and $$$ down the drain.

Idle Time -
Ever wonder if you should leave the car running while you wait for the kids to be dismissed from school? Leave it on if you'll be there less than a minute, otherwise it's more efficient to turn it off and restart it when you're ready to go.

Turn Down the Heat - Not just the furnace, but the water heater too -- set it at 130 to 140 degrees. Turn the setting to low or off when you leave for the weekend or for a long vacation, then put a note on your bathroom mirror so you'll remember to turn it up when you return.

Keeping it Clean - Washers can use more than 50 gallons of water per load, so avoid washing a lot of small loads whenever possible. Also, be sure to choose the lowest level of water needed for each load, use warm water instead of hot, and set the rinse cycle to use cold water.

Cold Food - Refrigerator temperatures should be set at about 40 degrees, give or take a degree or two. Freezer temps between 0 and 5 degrees are just right. Colder settings waste energy and won't help food.

Snip Six-Pack Rings - Those innocent looking soft plastic holders for soft drink cans and other products can entangle birds, fish, and small animals. Snip apart each ring before throwing it in the trash, or inquire whether they can be recycled locally.

Get a Charge Out of It - Never throw spent batteries in the trash. They contain mercury, a hazardous substance that will leak into groundwater or be burned and released into the air. Don't go there. Either switch to rechargeable batteries or collect used batteries in a shoebox out in the garage, clearly marked. Then take them to a recycling facility once or twice a year.

For more information on Earth Day events and things you can do, visit http://www.earthday.net/.