State Sales Data Shows Importance Of Supermarkets

Articles
June 09, 2011

State Sales Data Shows Importance Of Supermarkets

The Food Institute was recently asked by a member for some data on supermarkets and grocery stores at the state level and how they related to overall retail sales in each state. Using the latest five-Year Economic 2007 Census from the Census Bureau, analysts at the Food Institute point out the data clearly indicates how important the grocery store industry, mainly supermarkets, is to each state’s economy. We will tell you how to get a copy of the findings from The Food Institute as well.

The Food Institute was recently asked by a member for some data on  supermarkets and grocery stores at the state level and how they related to overall retail sales in each state. Using the latest five-Year Economic 2007 Census from the Census Bureau, analysts at the Food Institute point out the data clearly indicates how important the grocery store industry, mainly supermarkets, is to each state’s economy. We will tell you how to get a copy of the findings from The Food Institute as well.

For example, in Washington, DC and New York State, supermarkets  accounted for over 10% of both states’ overall retail locations. In the nation’s capital, supermarkets also accounted for over 20% of the state’s overall retail sales – totaling almost $800 million … and almost one out of every five retail employees in the District worked in a supermarket.  In New York State, meanwhile, 18% of the entire retail workforce could be found in supermarkets or grocery stores.

On the other end of the spectrum, it is not surprising that in the nation’s least populous state, Wyoming, there were only 108 supermarkets and grocery stores, making up only 3.7% of all retail locations. Nonetheless, these supermarkets –accounted for 10% of all retail sales in the state, and 13% of its retail employees – still an impressive percentage.

Looking at average sales per location by state, Arizona and Colorado lead the pack, with each location averaging nearly $12 million annually --- or just under one million dollars monthly.  Nevada, New Hampshire, and Utah were not far behind however – all topping $10 million annually. Washington DC and New York meanwhile, have the lowest average sales per location at 4.0 million and 3.6 million, respectively.

Looking purely at dollars, California sales at supermarkets and grocery stores lead the pack, by far, with $66 billion, and a distant second is Texas, boasting $34 billion, then Florida, with $30 billion.

In each state, however, The Food Institute notes that grocery stores and supermarkets are a vital part of economy.

If you would like a copy of the these tables, Lempert Report readers simply need to email Lina Khouri at The Food Institute atlina.khouri@foodinstitute.com and the latest copy of The Food Institute Report with the data will be sent to you at no charge.

 

The Food Institute was recently asked by a member for some data on  supermarkets and grocery stores at the state level and how they related to overall retail sales in each state. Using the latest five-Year Economic 2007 Census from the Census Bureau, analysts at the Food Institute point out the data clearly indicates how important the grocery store industry, mainly supermarkets, is to each state’s economy. We will tell you how to get a copy of the findings from The Food Institute as well.

For example, in Washington, DC and New York State, supermarkets  accounted for over 10% of both states’ overall retail locations. In the nation’s capital, supermarkets also accounted for over 20% of the state’s overall retail sales – totaling almost $800 million … and almost one out of every five retail employees in the District worked in a supermarket.  In New York State, meanwhile, 18% of the entire retail workforce could be found in supermarkets or grocery stores.

On the other end of the spectrum, it is not surprising that in the nation’s least populous state, Wyoming, there were only 108 supermarkets and grocery stores, making up only 3.7% of all retail locations. Nonetheless, these supermarkets –accounted for 10% of all retail sales in the state, and 13% of its retail employees – still an impressive percentage.

Looking at average sales per location by state, Arizona and Colorado lead the pack, with each location averaging nearly $12 million annually --- or just under one million dollars monthly.  Nevada, New Hampshire, and Utah were not far behind however – all topping $10 million annually. Washington DC and New York meanwhile, have the lowest average sales per location at 4.0 million and 3.6 million, respectively.

Looking purely at dollars, California sales at supermarkets and grocery stores lead the pack, by far, with $66 billion, and a distant second is Texas, boasting $34 billion, then Florida, with $30 billion.

In each state, however, The Food Institute notes that grocery stores and supermarkets are a vital part of economy.

If you would like a copy of the these tables, Lempert Report readers simply need to email Lina Khouri at The Food Institute atlina.khouri@foodinstitute.com and the latest copy of The Food Institute Report with the data will be sent to you at no charge.